This and That IV



Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:27 pm

breast feed


Sesame Street or cartoons?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:01 pm

Years ago I might have said Sesame Street. I recently found a paper I wrote back in college, touting the use of TV shows like Sesame Street and The Electric Company as approaches to teaching kids to read. While I still think there's some validity in using television media to educate, over time I've felt that what happens more often is that kids are simply taught to watch TV - not sure I'm seeing the bleedover that I would have expected all those years ago.

So, if you're a kid, and you're going to watch TV, you might as well be entertained!

I grew up on cartoons . . . so did J.J. for the most part, plus a healthy dose of Power Rangers . . . ;)

Although we DID go see Sesame Street Live a couple of times - it was worth it for Cookie Monster . . . a glutton after my own heart . . . lol


Animation or live-action shows?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Mon Aug 24, 2009 4:39 pm

Live action for the most part.

On cartoons, Daffy Duck or Donald Duck?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Tomfoolery » Mon Aug 24, 2009 5:30 pm

Oh, DEFINITELY Daffy Duck!!

"DUCK SEASON" "RABBIT SEASON" "DUCK SEASON" "RABBIT SEASON" "DUCK SEASON"

Marvin Martian or Wile E. Coyote?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:23 pm

You gotta love Wile E. Coyote . . . he's a model of perseverance!

You'd think after a point, he'd just give it up and find a diner somewhere . . . :rolleyes:

Family Guy or The Simpsons?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby thehallway » Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:53 pm

Simpsons if I had to choose. If any of you are lucky enough to see That Mitchell and Webb Look though, it's the best show on television. Comedy gold!

Sitcom or Sketch show?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Mon Aug 24, 2009 11:45 pm

Re Simpsons or Family Guy, Southpark!!

Depends on the sitcom and the sketch show, but given the dreadful writing for most sitcoms, I'd say a sketch show.

So, sketch show or stand-up comic?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Tomfoolery » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:11 pm

depending on the comic, stand up... I prefer those that can be VERY funny, but relatively clean as well - PG 13 or even a mild R... Bill Cosby, Bill Engvall, Ron White, Jeff Foxworthy, Robin Williams, others of that ilk. Although, there are exceptions ... for example, Joan Rivers' comedy routine is absolutely hilarious, even though I can't STAND her when she does other things.

I HATE it when comedians believe they have to use vulgarity to excess in order to be "funny" - Lisa Lampenelli comes to mind immediately. And I was never a fan of Eddie Murphy's "Raw" from back in the day...

ok, books - borrow (library / friends) or buy?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:24 pm

I'm a collector and re-reader, so I usually buy.

Light reading or ponderous tomes? ;)
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:26 pm

Both! I always have a serious read and a "twinkie for the brain" at the ready.

Re ponderous tomes, a history/biography, or heavy-duty literature?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Wed Aug 26, 2009 6:12 pm

History/biography, for the most part.

My dad used to get these huge books about various points in history, and I'd read through them for hours when I was a kid, just soaking in the vibe of the time and place of the thing.

Most of the "literature" I enjoy doesn't usually qualify as "classic" . . . ;)

Non-fiction - historical or scientific?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby thehallway » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:06 pm

Historical probably, I like to read biographies (though nothing too ancient). I'm also a fan of those Dan Brown thrillers, that said I've forgotten what the new one is to be called...

Realistic/social drama style fiction, or unrealistic action/thriller/sci-fi novels?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Wed Aug 26, 2009 11:48 pm

I like a "realistic" storyline that has a point, and that holds up regardless of the setting, whether it be historical, sci-fi or fantasy. For example, the Harry Potter books, Lord of the Rings, His Dark Materials, etc., contain quite a bit of social drama in a fantasy setting, with plenty of adventure and thrills to boot. I don't like action/adventure thrillers that are all thrills but no content, whether realistic or not.

On biographies, a straight bio with just the facts, or a novelization of a real person?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Fri Aug 28, 2009 1:34 am

Both have their merits. A novelization tends to take liberties with the facts sometimes, but is more entertaining. I really like autobiographies, where the author tells about his/her own life, if they're good storytellers . . . ;)

Back to sci-fi . . . hard science fiction based in scientific plausibility, or supernatural/horror?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Tomfoolery » Mon Aug 31, 2009 3:15 pm

I would have to say supernatural / horror, unless you put fantasy into the "sci-fi" genre. I do enjoy a good mix of sci-fi and fantasy, usually.

Still in the literature mode - hardback or paperback?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Mon Aug 31, 2009 10:15 pm

Definitely hardback if it's something I'm planning to keep - otherwise, paperback is fine.

Do you read once, or re-read books?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby thehallway » Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:06 pm

I once thought that re-reading a book is a pointless act, then subsequently found a book I had read years ago and enjoyed it just as much (if not more) as the first time round. I think you have to have forgotten all the details though for a re-read to be worthwhile.

Stretching out to all media, do you prefer really long extensive books/films/songs or shorter stuff than you can get through in an afternoon?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Tue Sep 01, 2009 3:59 pm

With books, I enjoy those that are a longer read - stretches out the enjoyment. With movies, I prefer those that can be watched in one sitting, although I don't mind LONG movies. I miss the days of longer movies that had intermissions. But I prefer a movie format to a "miniseries" format that requires more of a time investment.

That said, there have been some good miniseries too that I've enjoyed.

What's more important to you in a movie - non-stop action, or conversation?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Tue Sep 01, 2009 5:44 pm

Converstation. Dialogue is everything. I find non-stop action by turns boring and irritating in a jarring sort of way. As with sex or violence, action needs a context or it become meaningless and gratuitous. Some movies strike the right balance on all scores. But my favorite movies tend to be based on really great books, like The Namesake, book by Jumpa Lahiri. Then again, I am an unabashed Bollywood fan, so what do I know!!

On that theme, musicals or movies with strong soundtracks/scoring?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Chris2210 » Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:45 pm

Generally speaking I hate musicals with a very few notable exceptions. My Fair Lady being perhaps the most significant of those exceptions - but there again it does stick pretty close to the GBS original. I've also enjoyed some of the Steven Sondheim stuff I've seen. I was very pleasanlty surprised by the Sweeny Todd film.

I suppose that means for me that regardless of format and genre, content is king.

But speaking of genres, Superman or Batman - which is your favourite and why? [Perhaps it should be a new thread, but i'd quite like a range of opinions on that].
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Wed Sep 02, 2009 10:29 pm

Batman. Because he is dark and complex, yet heroic. He has a tragedy lurking in his past, and this motivates him to combat evil in his own way, on his own terms. I like the whole gothic vibe of the movies. And, I prefer seeing a hero emerge from the dark underbelly of this planet rather than coming from outer space. Superman, well, he is more like a big boy scout. Kind of bland and boring. As I recall, he wound up on earth because his parents left him there as a baby when Krypton was about to destruct. He is raised by humans, later discovers his superpowers, and decides to be a secret hero. In other words he became a hero because he could. Batman, on the other hand, was not born with superpowers and was driven by personal tradegy to become a hero. So there you have it.

For Harry Potter fans (who have read the entire series), Snape or Dumbledore?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Chris2210 » Thu Sep 03, 2009 11:13 am

yesireebob wrote:Batman. Because he is dark and complex, yet heroic. He has a tragedy lurking in his past, and this motivates him to combat evil in his own way, on his own terms. I like the whole gothic vibe of the movies. And, I prefer seeing a hero emerge from the dark underbelly of this planet rather than coming from outer space. Superman, well, he is more like a big boy scout. Kind of bland and boring. As I recall, he wound up on earth because his parents left him there as a baby when Krypton was about to destruct. He is raised by humans, later discovers his superpowers, and decides to be a secret hero. In other words he became a hero because he could. Batman, on the other hand, was not born with superpowers and was driven by personal tradegy to become a hero. So there you have it.


That's pretty close to my take too. I suppose on a mundane level I used to follow the Batman comics because they mostly had more interesting artwork too (I grew up around the era of Neal Adams). That seems to have turned in the opposite direction in the last few years, but I very rarely buy comics any more - the industry seems to be in a very moribund state with the same old themes rehashed endlessly in expensive formats.

I was given pause for thought by something Reg D Hunter said on Have I Got News for You (British current affairs comedy panel show). Something about Batman being a conservative's wet dream - 'billionaire goes out at night beating the shit out of street scum and leaves the corporate criminals alone...' It isn't entirely true of course, but it's funny and has enough truth in it to make me feel it's a slightly guilty pleasure.

Hunter seems to be fairly regular on a number of these type of shows over here and he's usually amongst the sharpest and wittiest in his deceptively laconic way. Is he well known over in the US?

For Harry Potter fans (who have read the entire series), Snape or Dumbledore?


Can't help you on that one - I didn't even know what a 'muggle' was until another TG used the term to refer to the cisgendered, which I thought was kind of funny even when it had to be explained. I won't pose another question - seeing as I've so singularly failed to answer that one...
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Re: This and That IV

Postby yesireebob » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:01 pm

Chris2210 wrote:I was given pause for thought by something Reg D Hunter said on Have I Got News for You (British current affairs comedy panel show). Something about Batman being a conservative's wet dream - 'billionaire goes out at night beating the shit out of street scum and leaves the corporate criminals alone...' It isn't entirely true of course, but it's funny and has enough truth in it to make me feel it's a slightly guilty pleasure.

Hunter seems to be fairly regular on a number of these type of shows over here and he's usually amongst the sharpest and wittiest in his deceptively laconic way. Is he well known over in the US?


Not familiar with him at all, but that's any interesting take on Batman. Hadn't considered the angle of corporate greed justifying itself with an heroic alter-ego. So what to make of Superman, disguised alien super-power savior of of Metropolis? ; )
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Re: This and That IV

Postby thehallway » Sat Sep 05, 2009 9:04 pm

You have 2009 posts! (No doubt it will be more by the time you read this)

yesireebob wrote:Not familiar with him at all, but that's any interesting take on Batman. Hadn't considered the angle of corporate greed justifying itself with an heroic alter-ego. So what to make of Superman, disguised alien super-power savior of of Metropolis? ; )


I'l let Chris2210 answer the above. But a question for the non-comic readers: What would you rather be: a penguin, that can't fly, but swims around like a fish, but it's a bird, or a flying fish, that can fly, but it is essentially still just a fish?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Chris2210 » Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:25 pm

It is indeed ironic that the generation gap with comics seems to have been reversed in recent years. I can't blame the younger generation for that - most of the films taken as individual examples are now far more interesting (and usually well-written) than the comic-books themselves. The massive exception to that of course being any of the Alan Moore material.

yesireebob wrote:Not familiar with him at all, but that's any interesting take on Batman. Hadn't considered the angle of corporate greed justifying itself with an heroic alter-ego. So what to make of Superman, disguised alien super-power savior of of Metropolis? ; )


Like you I always thought that Superman was too 'perfect' [morally] as well as too invincible to be interesting. But I suppose any analysis of superheroes [you could argue the same thing for any canon of pantheistic mythologies/folk heroes] can reveal a certain amount of flawed psychology in terms of their functioning as wish-fulfilment. It's more than possible to see the Big Blue Cheese as an analogy for western powers going into 'backward' countries to solve their problems [and history seems to demonstrate what an almighty f*ck-ups* that usually results in]. Mind you our motivation in these affairs is never quite the unalloyed nobility of the Krypton Kid's are they?




*asterix is there not because I've suddenly come over all prissy about using naughty words - it's just that the thread will be blocked out at work if it contains the word written properly.

As for whether I'd choose to be a fish that can sort of fly, or a bird that can sort of swim... I suppose the penguin is better adapted to its environment [they can swim far better than flying fishes can fly, even if they can't breathe underwater] but the fishy one can at least do a bit of both. Reminds me a bit of the questions Andy and Maggie used to pose in Extras... maybe we need a few more like that!

Which is the cooler animal - the bear or the eagle?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby thehallway » Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:03 pm

Chris2210 wrote:It is indeed ironic that the generation gap with comics seems to have been reversed in recent years. I can't blame the younger generation for that - most of the films taken as individual examples are now far more interesting (and usually well-written) than the comic-books themselves. The massive exception to that of course being any of the Alan Moore material.



Like you I always thought that Superman was too 'perfect' [morally] as well as too invincible to be interesting. But I suppose any analysis of superheroes [you could argue the same thing for any canon of pantheistic mythologies/folk heroes] can reveal a certain amount of flawed psychology in terms of their functioning as wish-fulfilment. It's more than possible to see the Big Blue Cheese as an analogy for western powers going into 'backward' countries to solve their problems [and history seems to demonstrate what an almighty f*ck-ups* that usually results in]. Mind you our motivation in these affairs is never quite the unalloyed nobility of the Krypton Kid's are they?




*asterix is there not because I've suddenly come over all prissy about using naughty words - it's just that the thread will be blocked out at work if it contains the word written properly.

As for whether I'd choose to be a fish that can sort of fly, or a bird that can sort of swim... I suppose the penguin is better adapted to its environment [they can swim far better than flying fishes can fly, even if they can't breathe underwater] but the fishy one can at least do a bit of both. Reminds me a bit of the questions Andy and Maggie used to pose in Extras... maybe we need a few more like that!

Which is the cooler animal - the bear or the eagle?


Extras! That's exactly where I got it from. Despite Maggie being generally conveyed as a bit dim, I always thought those questions she poses were strangely philisophical, even if she doesn't know it.

And I think the Eagle is cooler in this instance. Maybe not stronger or physically advantaged in any way, but it certainly gets points for style. And the wider the wingspan, the more impressive they look. I'm sure I heard somwhere that an Alaskan Bald Eagle could take down a large animal (perhaps not a bear), those are the ones on the American money aren't they? As for Bears, sure they're big and scary, but they seem a little dopey to me.

Another Maggie-influenced inquisition: Would you rather be a monkey with the brain of a human, or a human with the brain of a monkey?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Wed Sep 09, 2009 2:21 am

Chris2210 wrote:Generally speaking I hate musicals with a very few notable exceptions. My Fair Lady being perhaps the most significant of those exceptions - but there again it does stick pretty close to the GBS original. I've also enjoyed some of the Steven Sondheim stuff I've seen. I was very pleasanlty surprised by the Sweeny Todd film.



My Fair Lady is my FAVORITE musical - I love that they kept much of the dialogue from Pygmalion - it's SO very clever - and the songs seem to emerge from the dialogue in a more natural way than most musicals ("And now . . . a SONG!)


yesireebob wrote:For Harry Potter fans (who have read the entire series), Snape or Dumbledore?


Unfortunately, I haven't yet read the entire series, but I have seen the 1st 6 movies. From what I've heard about the last book, Snape may be a better guy in the end than he's thought to be.

But, you've just got to love Dumbledore . . . he's just the quintessential wizard . . . nothing gets by him . . . ;)


Chris2210 wrote:It is indeed ironic that the generation gap with comics seems to have been reversed in recent years. I can't blame the younger generation for that - most of the films taken as individual examples are now far more interesting (and usually well-written) than the comic-books themselves. The massive exception to that of course being any of the Alan Moore material.

Like you I always thought that Superman was too 'perfect' [morally] as well as too invincible to be interesting. But I suppose any analysis of superheroes [you could argue the same thing for any canon of pantheistic mythologies/folk heroes] can reveal a certain amount of flawed psychology in terms of their functioning as wish-fulfilment. It's more than possible to see the Big Blue Cheese as an analogy for western powers going into 'backward' countries to solve their problems [and history seems to demonstrate what an almighty f*ck-ups* that usually results in]. Mind you our motivation in these affairs is never quite the unalloyed nobility of the Krypton Kid's are they?


I was always a Superman fan. I mean, he was INVINCIBLE, how cool is that? Except for Kryptonite and magic - have to keep a LITTLE suspense going . . . ;)

And Superman was tortured in his own way - knowing that he could do cool things, but not really being able to tell anyone, and having to pretend to be bumbling Clark Kent . . . although in the old TV series, Kent was pretty cool too, as the senior reporter and Perry White's "go-to guy".

I also read Batman, and thought it was great that he rose above his personal tragedy to do good in the world and right wrongs - plus he had all those cool gadgets!

And in Justice League, you got to see him fight alongside Superman, and all the other DC superheroes.

This was in the 60's, when I used to read them. Now I'm told that Batman is dead and Robin is the new Batman, and such travesties . . . :rolleyes:


Chris2210 wrote:Which is the cooler animal - the bear or the eagle?


I'd have to go with the eagle - I've seen them up close in flight, and they're a marvel!

thehallway wrote:Extras! That's exactly where I got it from. Despite Maggie being generally conveyed as a bit dim, I always thought those questions she poses were strangely philisophical, even if she doesn't know it.

And I think the Eagle is cooler in this instance. Maybe not stronger or physically advantaged in any way, but it certainly gets points for style. And the wider the wingspan, the more impressive they look. I'm sure I heard somwhere that an Alaskan Bald Eagle could take down a large animal (perhaps not a bear), those are the ones on the American money aren't they? As for Bears, sure they're big and scary, but they seem a little dopey to me.

Another Maggie-influenced inquisition: Would you rather be a monkey with the brain of a human, or a human with the brain of a monkey?


And to answer this last one, given the choices, I'd have to say the monkey with the brain of a human. I'd hate to lose my intelligence . . . ;)


And since we're on monkeys, which would you be, a chimpanzee, or orangutan?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby thehallway » Wed Sep 09, 2009 9:03 pm

Chimpanzee I think. They are the more intellegent species are they not?

Image

...If a little rebellious, but I think you can forgive that of a monkey.

My question: Would you rather see the above chimpanzee in the wild (threatened by extinction) or in a home (albiet a cruel one that dresses the little fella up and gives it a gun)?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby tardistraveler » Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:22 pm

That's a hard call . . . in general, I think non-domesticated animals are better off in the wild, but when their species is faced with extinction, do you try to save a piece of it, even if it means captivity?

I'm thinking maybe so . . . it would be a shame to lose a species that we can learn from, and once they're gone, they're gone.

I'm wondering if the chimpanzees enjoy being around humans? They seem to.


See animals in a zoo, or in the wild?
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Re: This and That IV

Postby Chris2210 » Fri Sep 11, 2009 9:32 am

In the wild for sure, if possible. I'd agree we need to do all we can to protect species - particularly where it is our environmental incursions which put their existence in danger.

There's nothing more depressing than seeing a caged creature living out a miserable existence, but sometimes I do think we tend to over-anthropomorphise how animals 'feel'. It is rather a big compromise though to conserve if that means in any way domesticating - more than anything else it's a question of space and resources both in terms of captivity and the wild. Human greed is a tremendously destructive energy isn't it?

Away on a tangent and on a lighter note. Tarzan or Sherlock Holmes?
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