Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days



Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby N2yes » Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:18 am

The British version of psychedelic rock was irrefutably undertaken by early Pink Floyd. Too bad Syd lost his head as he was a creative force behind this legendary band. So may fine releases but PIPER AT THE GATES OF DAWN was so innovative I'm not sure anything can compare. That is, until David Gilmour took over and the music became more melodic and even more ethereal. DSothM was an awesome seller but not a fav of mine. I'd have to give that credit to the one release to A MOMENTARY LAPSE OF REASON. It showed that though Water's was a powerhouse, the band could function and do well without him. Just imagine, "Learning to Fly"....what a thrill...great number, too. What are your feelings of this band's early efforts? Was Syd a true genius or was Waters the brains behind this band's original sound.
"Master of images-Songs cast a light on you"
N2yes

User avatar
Starship Trooper
 
Posts: 5443
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Concord, New Hampshire, USA.

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby happytheman » Mon Aug 27, 2007 6:56 am

N2yes wrote:The British version of psychedelic rock was irrefutably undertaken by early Pink Floyd. Too bad Syd lost his head as he was a creative force behind this legendary band. So may fine releases but PIPER AT THE GATES OF DAWN was so innovative I'm not sure anything can compare. That is, until David Gilmour took over and the music became more melodic and even more ethereal. DSothM was an awesome seller but not a fav of mine. I'd have to give that credit to the one release to A MOMENTARY LAPSE OF REASON. It showed that though Water's was a powerhouse, the band could function and do well without him. Just imagine, "Learning to Fly"....what a thrill...great number, too. What are your feelings of this band's early efforts? Was Syd a true genius or was Waters the brains behind this band's original sound.


I can't believe I let this thread pass me by. I guess you were posting so many at once that it got "kicked" to page 2 before I saw it. Listening to Barrett and The Madcap Laughs gives you cold chills after listening to Pipers. To see a man literally "go mad" right before you ears is down right scary. Though there are "moments" on each album where you could see where Syd was heading, the overall "schizophrenia" leaves you scratching your head as to whether or not this is the same man who wrote 90 percent of Pipers. And mind you their wasn't a "throw away" on the entire album. Which was often the case in those days. I personally find Pink Floyd's catalog to be one of the few where I can honestly say I like them all. Few bands can I say that for. Sure The Final Cut sounds amazingly like The Wall and sure Momentary Lapse has 100 musicians augmenting the band (hmmm sounds like Union) but they finished up with a "crowning" jewel The Division Bell. I was only able to see them on the Momentary tour which was incredible to say the least. But when I watch Pulse if feels like you really are there for the "Dark Side of the Moon" experience from the original tour. I tend to "side" with Dave over the "Roger" issue. But it's hard not to like Amused to Death. And thankfully Roger released the DVD from that tour. I've heard that Dave has a great one in the pipe even as we speak. And from what little information I've gleaned from various websites Echoes in it's entirety will be part of the package! Far and away my favorite Pink Floyd song.
happytheman

Charter Member
 
Posts: 870
Joined: Tue Nov 26, 2002 6:00 pm
Location: .

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby elminster06 » Tue Aug 28, 2007 1:47 am

I think the secret behind Pink Floyd is really the teamwork of the band.
Dave Guitar(Echoes,Shine On), Roger songwriting and grandiose concept(Dsotm,Animal, the Wall), plus the capacity of Mason for innovative sound collage (think of alan psychedelic breakfast) and Wright melodic keyboard making a great soundscape. That's why Pink Floyd was so great.
Also i think Water and some other bandmate were student in architecture.
and most of song were great work of music architecture.

for what is of Syd era, i really like it, but it's really different like a different band. I can't really qualify Syd as a genius cause he only made 1 great album, the other one is more like a descent to madness with some clarity moment.
Maybe he was just a shining star burning to fast that went supernova.

Shine on.
elminster06

User avatar
Active Member
 
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:02 am
Location: Rimouski, in Quebec Canada

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby BlueEagle » Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:03 am

I was in England when PIPER was released and remember hearing SEE EMILY PLAY on Radio Caroline. That album was so far ahead of the Beatles or SF psychedelia it was scary.
Also SAUCERFUL OF SECRETS was another landmark album for its time and in some ways I think was a better album than the jazzified DSOM.
stardust we are, see how we shine
BlueEagle

User avatar
Member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 12:58 am
Location: ON THE EDGE

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby happytheman » Fri Sep 28, 2007 12:32 pm

BlueEagle wrote:I was in England when PIPER was released and remember hearing SEE EMILY PLAY on Radio Caroline. That album was so far ahead of the Beatles or SF psychedelia it was scary.
Also SAUCERFUL OF SECRETS was another landmark album for its time and in some ways I think was a better album than the jazzified DSOM.


Saucer was an excellent album. Very much the "period" though I find songs like Set the Controls on Rogers last live album held up very well with time. Regarding DSOTM, I think to this day "marketing genius's" still scratch their heads over how to "duplicate" a monster like this album. In a lot of ways DSOTM was simply "all the stuff" they had already been doing live "polished" up with great engineering, plus a "slick" album cover and of course extensive touring. It just seemed to fit the "FM" format perfectly. I can think of at least 4 if not 5 songs that got heavy airplay from it. In fact once a disc jocky starts off with Us and Them they inevitably play the rest of the side. And who could argue with the hit single "with a bullet" Money?
happytheman

Charter Member
 
Posts: 870
Joined: Tue Nov 26, 2002 6:00 pm
Location: .

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby yesman90125 » Fri Feb 15, 2008 8:26 pm

I dont think Syd was any kind od genious he was pretty screwed up and many of the songs he did like "Bike" were pretty stupid. i like some of saucerfull of secrets and Piper at the Gates of Dawn but most of the two albums could be put into one and still wouldn't be their best stuff
Aimals was may favorite with a tip of the hat to wish you were here
I think Syd made a better inspiration for Roger than he made a front man . I know that even when I saw pink floyd in the david gilmour era ala momentary lapse of reason and The division bell tours (Which were sold out satdium shows) and when I saw roger Waters on Radio kaos there were still people in the audience shouting SYD (maybe they were selling acid)but I think it speaks to the fact that some people were really into syds stuff . it just sounds really disjointed and experimental to me. maybe it helped to shape the sound that eventually came out with Meddle and DSOTM but those later albums with the entire band contributing to the sound were much better and still psycedelic (if thats your taste)
alot of people dont like a band as much after they become hugely successfull but in the case of pink floyd I think they just got better
I also think the divsion bell still sounds like pink floyd and was a great
effort on david gilmours part.
yesman90125

Starship Trooper
 
Posts: 2764
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2001 6:00 pm

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby N2yes » Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:55 am

here's some rare footage of the band with Syd. Notice Mr. Waters using a Rickenbacker.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LvkjqkAgsE&feature=related
"Master of images-Songs cast a light on you"
N2yes

User avatar
Starship Trooper
 
Posts: 5443
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Concord, New Hampshire, USA.

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby sound_chaser » Tue May 06, 2008 10:10 am

N2yes wrote:The British version of psychedelic rock was irrefutably undertaken by early Pink Floyd.




Irrefutably, yes, but, exclusively? No. I would place The Beatles at the forefront of British psychedelia, with Pink Floyd just behind. The band had been involved with drugs ever since their days in Hamburg, where they used to take speed like Smarties in order to get through the long hours that were required of them. I think I’m right in saying it was Bob Dylan who first introduced them to dope in 1964...naughty old Bob! Drug references had been creeping into The Beatles songs since at least Rubber Soul: listen to The Word for proof of that one. And they are clearly amusingly stoned in some outtakes of the film Help.

Lennon and Harrison were the first Beatles to start using LSD, as they were avidly following events unfolding in America. LSD references are to found throughout the 1966 album Revolver (I‘m Only Sleeping, Love You To, She Said She Said, Doctor Robert and of course, the mighty Tomorrow Never Knows, which was based on Timothy Leary’s psychedelic manual, The Tibetan Book Of The Dead), as well as the b-side to Paperback Writer, Rain. Simply because of their incredible influence, it was the Beatles who popularised the psychedelic movement in the UK. Other bands were also getting in on the act: bands such as The Yardbirds (Happenings Ten Years Ago) and The Rolling Stones (Paint It Black). Donovan was one of the leading players in the new dawn with his 1966 album Sunshine Superman: along with the title track, there were at least two other key LSD songs in Season of the Witch and Celeste.

And so to Pink Floyd.

For a detailed account of Syd‘s life and the first steps of Pink Floyd, look here: http://www.sydbarrett.org/sydslife.htm

Musically, if you can, check out the early demos of Lucy Leave and King Bee (easily available on the internet.): both of these songs show the unusual vocal and musical styles that made Syd so unique. And then of course, there is the debut single, Arnold Layne: a cautionary tale of an unusual fetish with ladies underwear. The b-side, Candy And A Current Bun, was originally titled, Let’s Roll Another One, so you can see how drugs were already an influence on Syd’s thinking. The next single, See Emily Play, was to be a big hit for the band and it really defines the times very well.

The debut album, The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, was fittingly recorded in the next studio to The Beatles, as they were making their psychedelic masterpiece, Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band. I can’t speak highly enough of Piper, because the song writing is so damn great. The album is also the perfect comparison of the whimsical nature that British psychedelia would be, to the more hard edged Vietnam influenced version that would come out of America. In my view, Piper is a must have album for any self-respecting fan of pop/rock music.

The third single, Apples & Oranges bombed. I can see why, but it is still a brilliant song and a great example of how Syd was getting more and more out there. As Syd slowly unravelled, so his contribution to the band diminished. David Gilmour was now in place (initially as fifth man) for the bands second album, A Saucerful Of Secrets and the differences between that album and Piper are immense. There is a lot of debate as to what songs Syd contributed to on Saucerful, but the one certainty is that he wrote and sang lead on the final track of the album, Jugband Blues. This song is extraordinary, because Syd is singing of his own demise and departure from what was the band, whilst at the same time, seemingly knowing there was nothing he could do about it.

There are at least two other unreleased songs from this period that are essential to understanding the myth of Syd Barrett. They are Vegetable Man and Scream Thy Last Scream Old Woman In A Casket (again, easily available to download.). Along with Jugband Blues, these two songs make for very uncomfortable listening, but they did point the way that Syd would go after Pink Floyd, with his solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett. His star may have shone only briefly, but if only for a short while, his highly influential brilliance was undeniable. Genius? Probably.
sound_chaser

 
Posts: 1516
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2001 5:00 pm
Location: The Light Side.

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby N2yes » Wed May 07, 2008 5:52 am

Points well made, SC!!
"Master of images-Songs cast a light on you"
N2yes

User avatar
Starship Trooper
 
Posts: 5443
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Concord, New Hampshire, USA.

Re: Pink Floyd...the Syd Barrett Days

Postby sound_chaser » Wed May 07, 2008 9:04 am

I was very sorry to learn of the death of Norman "Hurricane" Smith recently. His contribution to early Pink Floyd should not go without appreciation. Syd Barrett must have taken some reigning in, because he was not an easy person to work with. Syd saw himself primarily as an artist and as such, he couldn’t see why they had to keep going over songs to get them right. As an artist, he was used to painting a picture and then moving on to the next one.

It was Smith’s job to keep Barrett focused and working on the songs that were to make Piper the legend that it became. And he must have been a big asset to the band, as they conjured up the sounds and textures of British psychedelia: in my book, that puts him on a par with the incredible work that George Martin did with The Beatles, particularly with revolver and Sgt. Pepper.

Here’s a link to the BBC obituary: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7284108.stm
sound_chaser

 
Posts: 1516
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2001 5:00 pm
Location: The Light Side.


Return to When Rock Was Young

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron