The Doors



The Doors

Postby yesireebob » Sat May 24, 2008 12:27 am

Perhaps I missed it, but I did not see a thread for the Doors. Having grown up in LA but, alas, too young to actually have seen this band live, the Doors' music has always been a big part of the soundtrack of my early years. I am kind of on-again off again; at times I think their music is indispensable and Jim Morrison was a genius, others I can only marvel at the excesses and utter waste that was Jim Morrison's life. I used to have the albums but later just got a compilation CD for those *Moments When Only The Doors Will Do* .

I recently watched the "making of" the debut self-titled album on VH1, followed by Oliver Stones' movie The Doors, which I had seen before but a very long time ago. Shortly thereafter, I bought the 2007 remix/remaster of the debut album, and oh boy what a revelation! Has the entire "she gets HIGH" on Break On Through (it's laughable that this would have been edited out to get air play considering what passes these days), and the new mix of Light My Fire and The End is incredible. I was so impressed I went ahead and ordered the remixes of Strange Days, Waiting for the Sun, LA Woman, and Morrison Hotel from Amazon. In addition to highlighting Jim Morrison's amazing ability to go from soft crooner to shrieking wildman in the same breath, the new mixes also reminds you of how very talented the rest of the band was. I never realized before that the band never had a bass player; that was Ray playing electronic bass as well as keyboards.

I love it when I "rediscover" bands I have long taken for granted!
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesman90125 » Sat May 24, 2008 12:49 am

Also among my favorite bands!
I was pretty obsessed with the life and times of JDM for a long time
ironicly last night on VH1 they showed The Doors Movie followed by the making of the first album
RDM was on there, allways good to hear from Ray he's cool and very insightfull
those songs are just so different from anything else
what can you say
The American Beatles?
every song is fantastic
and Jim was one of a kind
I would recomend to anyone that likes to read
even if your not a Doors fan "No One Here Gets Out Alive"by Danny Sugerman and Jerry Hopkins
One of the greatest books ever written
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Re: The Doors

Postby N2yes » Sat May 24, 2008 7:32 pm

No disrespect intended, Y-Bob, but I never cared for them. This would perhaps, lie behind their exclusion on my part. However, I realize their fan base was large at one time, so I commend you for bringing it up!
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesman90125 » Sat May 24, 2008 8:01 pm

There's certinly a darkness associated with some Doors music.
I could see where Yes fans wouldn't nessisarily Prefer that approach
it's just another side of things though
I started out really hating the Ghostlike sounds of Morrison
but after getting into some of the lesser played stuff
I turned into a huge fan
"The End" and "when The Music's Over" and"The soft Parade"
were songs that drew me in at first
now I even like stuff like LA Woman and Touch me-love her madly etc.
I don't think The Doors fan base is in any trouble thoughone of the first bands in the hall of fame even before Zeppelin
Pretty timeless music too
as Bart Simpson said"Making teenagers Depressed is like shooting fish in a Barrel"
but I think the Doors music has more to offer than just depressing sullen sounds
they were one of the first to incorperate Jazz and classical sounds into the music
as well as Morrison for all his oddities is a really solid and profesional singer
not a weak track on any Doors CD
very poetic and timeless music
the Theater in Rock Sort of thing that Jim was doing was repeated by so many musicians and performers
that it's almost expected out of a certin Genre' of music
like Prog/Punk/Heavy metal/jam bands
the other thing is the Manzarek factor
really creative organ work Powerfull energetic
doing the Bass lines on the Organ with his left hand while playing lead on his right Pretty goood pretty good-Pretty neat
very catchy moods too
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Re: The Doors

Postby happytheman » Sat May 24, 2008 11:39 pm

yesman90125 wrote:not a weak track on any Doors CD
very poetic and timeless music


Agree, their catalog holds up against any band. Sure Jim was an ***hole (just look at any live footage) but heh....... Great band.
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesman90125 » Sat May 24, 2008 11:54 pm

Morrison studied Crowd psycology at UCLA as well as films
he had a 150IQ
it was his intent to create Riots at every concert
he was a very intellegent guy
but rather strange
I believe that The Doors still hold the record for most riots at live shows
so Jim Got what he wanted
anyway
I can see where Morrison would be seen in a negative light but the guy was very interesting
very unique
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesireebob » Sun May 25, 2008 5:44 pm

I agree with the comment re the Doors being among the first to incorporate classical and jazz into rock. Listen to the organ in Light My Fire, it is positively Baroque. That song was one of the first really long songs that needed to be edited for radio, and that organ and guitar interlude in the middle could be Bach playing rock. And Alabama Song (Whiskey Bar) is actually by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht. "The End" is an incredible stream-of conciousness poem. I have been listening to the remix of the debut album a lot the last couple of days, and it really strikes me how innovative they were, perhaps one of the very first "prog" bands. Only six albums, but what an amazing catalong. And Jim Morrison, despite his excesses and despite being a real A-hole much of the time, wrote some timeless lyrics. Yes, he did play to the dark side, but consider how very much this went against the grain in that era of peace, love, age-of-aquarius utopianism. That dark, eery quality of the Doors was exactly the counterpoint that resonated so profoundly. From End of the Night:
Realms of bliss
Realms of light
Some are born to sweet delight
Some are born to the endless night.
End of the night. End of the night. End of the night.
We all know which realm Jim Morrison was born to, and his poetic expression of that realm was outstanding.
I think Pink Floyd, Porcupine Tree, and other bands following the darker muse owe quite a lot to the Doors.
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Re: The Doors

Postby Greenglade's Frog » Mon May 26, 2008 4:17 am

Yeah Doors music was really powerful and it seemed that everyone wanted to do a "Morrisson" back when the Greatest Hits album and the Sugarman book came out in '80.

Lots of kids getting stoned and acting rebellious.

I remember staying in this empty beach house above Malibu and listening to that album with my friends and we got a sixer each and I pulled a Morrison by jumping out in the ocean at 3 am(I hit a rock) by the light of a full moon in early spring chill, inspired by "Crystal Ship

We had no lights in the house really, just a fire going in the fireplace and we sat on the floor, drinking brews and listening to the Doors 1st album over and over and waves crashed below the window.

Poetry of the lyrics was influenced by Jim's readings of Rimbaud and Baudelaire. The music in many ways was the antithesis of So Cal cheeriness and surf music..he brought a abstract Poe-Parisian darkness to L.A. theme music....

I don't think Morrisson would be too happy in today's world, so better offf dead...
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Re: The Doors

Postby sound_chaser » Mon May 26, 2008 8:29 am

An extremely important and influential band, The Doors albums really should be a part of any self-respecting rock music fans collection. I had a weird introduction to The Doors, because I had a drug crazed older brother, who used to pray at the alter of Jim Morrison and would delight in reciting the lyrics of The End in front of me: It's no exaggertaion, when I tell you that I woke up one morning to find him standing over me with a knife: that’s how obsessed he was and how frightening the situation was as well.

Understandably, I had a problem with The Doors for a long time, although I always loved songs such as Light My Fire, Riders On The Storm and Love Street. But as I said in my Beach Boys post, there came a time in my life when I felt compelled to seek out the true landmark rock albums and inevitably, that eventually led to the Doors. The debut album is a true masterpiece, with every song being a highlight. Waiting For The Sun, is almost as good and is another must have really: although I’ve often wondered if the band should have been sued for plagiarism, for ripping off the Kinks All day & All Of The Night riff for Hello, I Love You?

I’m surprised to read that N2 doesn’t rate The Doors, because I would have thought the heavily blues leaden LA Woman would have bee right up his street. Interesting to see a Pink Floyd comparison, because after Syd Barrett left, you can definitely hear a Doors influence in their material around the time of A Saucerful Of Secrets and the soundtrack to the film, More. So yes, although I had a difficult musical initiation, you can definitely count me in as a fan.
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Re: The Doors

Postby Greenglade's Frog » Mon May 26, 2008 4:48 pm

I think Doors is one the quintessential L.A. bands...
They thumbed their noses at American mainstream society
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesman90125 » Mon May 26, 2008 6:11 pm

I allways thought Manzarek was pretty mainstreem and still seems to be in his recent interviews(he did the school of rock thing like Jon did)
Morrison no doubt thumbed his nose at mainstream society
and at pretty much everything
even though he was from DC and Florida not LA
he's considered a LA Guy

I often wonder what Jim would have become had he lived
could you imagine a 60 year old Jim Morrison ?
that'd be wierd
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Re: The Doors

Postby Greenglade's Frog » Mon May 26, 2008 6:14 pm

Morrison today in Paris, poet , screenwriter
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesireebob » Mon May 26, 2008 9:11 pm

He came out of nowhere, and I could see him retreating back to nowhere and applying his talents to another media such as film. Nearly impossible to pull off a retreat after that kind of fame, however. Success literally was the death of him. Although, it would be just like him to fake his death to allow him to reincarnate himself. Perhaps that is why that myth perserveres.
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Re: The Doors

Postby Greenglade's Frog » Mon May 26, 2008 11:15 pm

His films probably wouldn't sell in the US.
UCLA gave him a bad deal, but he would have been a notable director by now worldwide
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesman90125 » Tue May 27, 2008 12:31 am

obviously Jim had an interest in Peotry and film
even though his musical career allowed for exploration into both
his fame and knowlege could have taken him far
but alas Jim morrison's destiny seems to be as much of a warning
as it is an invitation
a warning about excess and the emptiness of fame
yet an invitation into self exploration and the overthrow of boundries
the line of which persons need to decide for themselves how far they should go
where Exploration becomes excess and excess leads to ruin
I'll always admire Jim for jumping over the fence rather than stradling it
but I can't help but be saddened by the outcome
like so many of his generation he burned brightly and burned out too soon
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Re: The Doors

Postby Yesola » Wed May 28, 2008 5:10 pm

Yeah...I read the Sugerman book when it came out, all my friends did. We all read it in a few days. It sent us into a doors fenzie for a good year. There were a few of us that would read his poetry from that American Prayer album in our drama classes.

I think the Doors were my pre-yes instruction, when I sarted to listen to them it was the summer before I went into my Jr year of High School. It was the begining of listening to music with a more crtitical ear. I was into Yes right after I graduated.
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Re: The Doors

Postby tardistraveler » Tue Jun 03, 2008 5:47 pm

yesireebob wrote:I agree with the comment re the Doors being among the first to incorporate classical and jazz into rock. Listen to the organ in Light My Fire, it is positively Baroque. That song was one of the first really long songs that needed to be edited for radio, and that organ and guitar interlude in the middle could be Bach playing rock.



I was first attracted to The Doors due to those keys . . . they were so unique at the time in rock music and gave it a flair that set their music apart from others.

yesireebob wrote:Yes, he did play to the dark side, but consider how very much this went against the grain in that era of peace, love, age-of-aquarius utopianism.



Yes and no. I think most people during that time, although they may have dreamed of a utopia of peace and love, also understood the reality that the Doors spoke of. They were living it - the dark side of the utopian life they pined for - the drugs that altered consciousness but also brought death, the "free love" which came with STD's and responsibilities that the term belied. Much of the Doors music explored the war, and the senselessness of it, while painting the reality of it - that was their way of making the statement.


yesireebob wrote:That dark, eery quality of the Doors was exactly the counterpoint that resonated so profoundly. From End of the Night:
Realms of bliss
Realms of light
Some are born to sweet delight
Some are born to the endless night.
End of the night. End of the night. End of the night.
We all know which realm Jim Morrison was born to, and his poetic expression of that realm was outstanding.
I think Pink Floyd, Porcupine Tree, and other bands following the darker muse owe quite a lot to the Doors.



Absolutely! Music is such a wonderful thing in that it lets us explore all sides of life . . . :)
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Re: The Doors

Postby yesireebob » Sun Jun 08, 2008 6:44 am

I got the remix of Waiting for the Sun, OMG! Aside from the much-improved quality of the mix, the bonus material is spectacular. Includes Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor, and a 17 minute version of Celebration of the Lizard, the middle part of which is, of course, Not to Touch the Earth, the only part that got on the album. The bonus material alone is worth the price of admission!
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Re: The Doors

Postby tardistraveler » Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:28 pm

Very cool!

I might have to check that one out!
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