Deep Purple



Deep Purple

Postby N2yes » Tue Aug 28, 2007 10:40 pm

Deep Purple were an English hard rock band formed in Hertfordshire in 1968. Along with Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, they are considered one of the pioneers of heavy metal and hard rock, although the members of the band have always refused to label themselves as the former. They are claimed to have sold over 100 million albums worldwide.

The band has gone through many line-up changes, as well as an eight-year hiatus and two reunions. Their second and most commercially successful line-up featured: Ian Gillan (singer), Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Jon Lord (keyboard), Roger Glover (bass guitar) and Ian Paice (drums). Paice is the only original member still with the band.
(1964–1968) Pre-Deep Purple years

In 1967, former Searchers drummer Chris Curtis contacted London businessman Tony Edwards in the hope that he would manage a new group he was putting together, to be called Roundabout; so called because the members would get on and off like a musical roundabout. Suitably impressed, Edwards agreed to finance the venture with two business partners: John Coletta and Ron Hire (Hire-Edwards-Coletta – HEC Enterprises).hi

The first recruit was classically trained Hammond organ player Jon Lord, who had most notably played with The Artwoods (led by Art Wood, brother of future Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie, and featuring Keef Hartley). He was followed by session guitarist Ritchie Blackmore who was persuaded to return from Hamburg to audition for the new group. Curtis soon dropped out, but HEC Enterprises, as well as Lord and Blackmore, were keen to carry on.

For the bass guitar, Lord suggested his old friend Nick Simper, with whom he had played in a band called The Flower Pot Men and their Garden (formerly known as The Ivy League) back in 1967. Simper's claims to fame (apart from Purple) were that he had been in Johnny Kidd & The Pirates and had been in the car crash that killed Kidd. He was also in Screaming Lord Sutch's The Savages, where he played with Blackmore.

The line-up was completed by singer Rod Evans and drummer Ian Paice from The Maze. After a brief tour of Denmark in the spring of 1968, Blackmore suggested a new name: Deep Purple, which was his grandmother's favourite song.

1968–1970) Breakthrough

In October 1968, the group had tremendous success in the US (but not the UK) with a cover of Joe South's "Hush", which reached #4. The song was taken from their debut album Shades of Deep Purple, and they were booked to support Cream on their Goodbye tour.

The band's second album, The Book of Taliesyn, was released in the United States to coincide with this tour, although it would not be released in their home country until the following year. 1969 saw the release of their third album, Deep Purple, which contained strings and woodwind on one track (April). Several influences were in evidence, notably Vanilla Fudge and Lord's classical antecedants such as Bach and Rimskiy Korsakov.

After these three albums and extensive touring in the States, their American record company, Tetragrammaton, went out of business, leaving the band with no money and an uncertain future. (Tetragrammaton's assets were assumed by Warner Bros. Records, who would release Deep Purple's records in the U.S. throughout the 1970's.) Returning to England in early 1969, they recorded a single called "Emmaretta", named for a cast member of the musical Hair whom Rod Evans was trying to seduce, before Evans and Simper were fired.

The band hunted down singer Ian Gillan from Episode Six, a band that had released several singles in the UK without achieving their big break. Six's drummer Mick Underwood - an old comrade of Blackmore's from his Savages days - made the introductions, and bassist Roger Glover tagged along for the initial sessions. Purple persuaded Glover to join full-time; an act that effectively killed Episode Six and gave Underwood a guilt complex that lasted nearly a decade - until Gillan recruited him for his new post-Purple band in the late 1970s.

This created the quintessential Deep Purple "Mark 2" lineup, whose first, inauspicious release was a Greenaway-Cook tune titled "Hallelujah", which flopped.

The band gained some much-needed publicity with the Concerto for Group and Orchestra, a three-movement epic composed by Lord as a solo project and performed by the band at the Royal Albert Hall with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Malcolm Arnold. Together with Five Bridges by The Nice, it was one of the first collaborations between a rock band and an orchestra, although at the time, certain members of Purple (Blackmore and Gillan especially) were less than happy at the group being tagged as "a group who played with orchestras" when actually what they had in mind was to develop the band into a much tighter, hard-rocking style.

(1970–1976) On top of the world and breakup

Shortly after the orchestral release, the band began a hectic touring and recording schedule that was to see little respite for the next three years. Their first studio album of this period, released in mid-1970, was Deep Purple in Rock (a name deliberately chosen to distance the rock album from the concerto) and contained the then concert staples "Speed King", "Into The Fire", and "Child in Time". The band also issued the UK Top Ten single "Black Night". Blackmore's and Lord's guitar-keyboard interplay coupled with Ian Gillan's howling vocals and the rhythm section of Glover and Paice, now started to take on a unique identity and become instantly recognisable to rock fans throughout Europe.

A second album, the more mellow and creatively progressive Fireball (a favourite of Gillan but not of the rest of the band ), was issued in the summer of 1971. The title track "Fireball" was released as a single, as was "Strange Kind of Woman" - not from the album but recorded during the same sessions.

Within weeks of Fireball's release, the band was already performing songs planned for the next album. One song (which later became "Highway Star") was performed at the first gig of the Fireball tour, having been written on the bus to a show in Portsmouth, in answer to a journalist's question: "How do you go about writing songs?" Three months later, in December 1971, the band found itself in Switzerland to record Machine Head. The album was due to be recorded at a casino in Montreux, using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio, but a fire during a Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention gig burned down the casino. The album was actually recorded at the nearby empty Grand Hotel. This incident famously inspired the song "Smoke on the Water". Gillan believes that he witnessed a man fire a flare gun into the ceiling during the concert, prompting Zappa to comment: "Arthur Brown in person!"

Continuing from where both previous albums left off, Machine Head has since become one of the band's most famous albums, including tracks that became live classics such as "Highway Star", "Space Truckin' ", "Lazy", and "Smoke on the Water", all of which were performed in their live album Made in Japan. Deep Purple continued to tour and record at a rate that would be rare thirty years on: when Machine Head was recorded, the group had only been together three and a half years, yet it was their seventh LP. Meanwhile the band undertook four US tours in 1972 and the August tour of Japan that led to a double-vinyl live release, Made in Japan. Originally intended as a Japan-only record, its world-wide release saw the double become an instant hit. It remains one of rock music's most popular and highest selling live concert recordings (although at the time it was perhaps seen as less important, as only Glover and Paice turned up to mix it).

The classic Purple Mk 2 line-up continued to work and released the album Who Do We Think We Are (1973), featuring the hit single "Woman from Tokyo", but internal tensions and exhaustion were more noticeable than ever. The bad feelings culminated in Ian Gillan quitting the band after their second tour of Japan in the summer of 1973, and Roger Glover being pushed out with him. Their replacements were an unknown singer from Saltburn in North East England, David Coverdale, and Midlands bassist/vocalist Glenn Hughes, formerly of Trapeze. This new line-up continued into 1974 with the heavier blues-rock album Burn, another highly successful release and world tour. Hughes and Coverdale added both vocal harmonies and a more funky element to the band's music, a sound that was even more apparent on the late 1974 release Stormbringer. Besides the title track, the album had a number of songs that received much radio play, such as "Lady Double Dealer", "The Gypsy", and "Soldier Of Fortune". Yet Blackmore voiced unhappiness with the album, and as a result left the band in the spring of 1975 to form his own band with Ronnie James Dio and Elf, called Rainbow.

With Blackmore's departure, Deep Purple was left to fill one of the biggest vacancies in rock music. In spite of this, the rest of the band refused to go down without a fight, and to the surprise of many long-time fans actually announced a replacement for the "irreplaceable" Man in Black; American Tommy Bolin.

It was Coverdale who had suggested auditioning Bolin. "He walked in, thin as a rake, his hair coloured green, yellow, and blue with feathers in it. Slinking along beside him was this stunning Hawaiian girl in a crochet dress with nothing on underneath. He plugged into four Marshall 100-watt stacks and . . ."[citation needed] The job was his. Bolin had been a member of many now-forgotten mid-60s bands - Denny & The Triumphs, American Standard, and Zephyr, which released three albums from '69-72. Before Purple, Bolin's best-known recordings were made as a session musician on Billy Cobham's 1973 jazz fusion album, Spectrum, and on The James Gang's "Bang" (1973) and "Miami" (1974). He had also jammed with such luminaries as Dr. John, Albert King, and Alphonse Mouzon and was busy working on his first solo album, Teaser, when he accepted the invitation to join Deep Purple.

The resulting album, Come Taste the Band, was released in the US in October 1975. Despite mixed reviews, the collection revitalised the band once again, bringing a new, extreme funk edge to their hard rock sound. Bolin's influence was crucial, and with encouragement from Glenn Hughes and David Coverdale, the guitarist came up with much of the material. Later, Bolin's personal problems with drugs began to manifest themselves, and after cancelled shows and below-par concert performances, the writing was on the wall for the band.

(1976–1984) Band split, side projects

The end came on tour in Britain in March 1976 at the Liverpool Empire Theatre. David Coverdale reportedly walked off in tears and handed in his resignation, to which he was allegedly told there was no band left to quit. The decision to pull the plug on Purple had been made some time before the last show by Lord and Paice (the last remaining original members), who hadn't told anyone else. The break-up was finally made public in July 1976.

Later, Bolin had just finished recording his second solo album, Private Eyes, when, on December 4, 1976, tragedy struck. In Miami, during a tour supporting Jeff Beck, Bolin was found unconscious by his girlfriend. Unable to wake him, she hurriedly called paramedics, but it was too late. The official cause of death: multiple-drug intoxication. He was 25 years old.

After the break-up most of the past and present members of Deep Purple went on to have considerable success in a number of other bands, including Rainbow, Whitesnake, Black Sabbath and Gillan. There were, however, a number of promoter-led attempts to get the band to reform, especially with the revival of the hard rock market in the late 70s/early 80s. By 1980, a new version of the band surfaced.

(1984–1994) Reunions and breakups

In 1980, Rod Evans, along with a group of unknown musicians, toured under the banner of Deep Purple. As he was the only original member, and one little known to most fans, this band was instantly derided by press and fans alike as a fraud. The lineup performed concerts in Mexico and the USA before legal action was taken to deny them the use of the name. More information on this "fake" Deep Purple is available here and here.

However, in April 1984, eight years after the demise of Deep Purple, a full-scale (and legal) reunion took place. It was announced on BBC radio's The Friday Rock Show that the "classic" early 70s line-up of Blackmore, Gillan, Glover, Lord, and Paice was reforming and recording new material. The band signed deals with Rainbow's labels, Polydor Records in Europe and Mercury in North America (both labels were at the time owned by PolyGram, and are now part of the Universal Music Group). The album Perfect Strangers was released in October 1984. A solid release, it sold extremely well, and included the singles and concert staples "Knockin' At Your Back Door" and "Perfect Strangers". The reunion tour followed, starting in Australia and wending its way across the world to the USA, then into Europe by the following summer. Financially, the tour was also a tremendous success. The UK homecoming proved limited, as they elected to play just a single festival show at Knebworth (with main support from the Scorpions). The weather was famously bad but 80,000 turned up anyway.

The line-up then recorded The House of Blue Light in 1986, which was followed by a world tour in 1987. This was followed by another live album Nobody's Perfect (1988) which was culled from several shows on this tour, but still largely based around the by-now familiar "Made in Japan" set-list. In the UK a new version of "Hush" was released to mark 20 years of the band. In 1989, Ian Gillan was fired from the band, as his relations with Blackmore had again soured, and their musical differences had widened too far. Gillan's replacement was former Rainbow vocalist Joe Lynn Turner. This line up recorded just one album, Slaves & Masters (1990) and toured in support. It is one of Blackmore's favourite Purple albums, though some fans regard it as little more than a Rainbow album. In fact, caustic critics dubbed the album "Deep Rainbow." Despite the renewed excellence of the band during this period, many hard-core fans were unhappy with Turner, preferring Gillan.

With the tour done, Turner was forced out, as Lord, Paice and Glover wanted Gillan back in the fold. Blackmore relented and the classic line-up recorded The Battle Rages On in 1993. During the European tour during the fall of 1993, tensions between Gillan and Blackmore came to a head yet again. Blackmore walked out in November 1993, never to return. Joe Satriani was drafted in, so the live dates (in Japan) in December could be completed. Satriani stayed on for a European Summer tour in 1994, and he was asked to stay permanently, but his record contract commitments prevented this. The band unanimously chose Dixie Dregs/Kansas guitarist Steve Morse to become Blackmore's permanent successor.

(1994–present) Revival with Steve Morse
Roger Glover and Steve Morse jamming during the intro to Highway Star

Steve Morse’s arrival revitalised the band creatively, and in 1996 a new album titled Purpendicular was released, showing a wide variety of musical styles. With a revamped set list to tour, Deep Purple enjoyed success throughout the rest of the 1990s, releasing the harder-sounding Abandon in 1998, and touring with renewed enthusiasm. In 1999, Jon Lord, with the help of a fan who was also a musicologist and composer, painstakingly recreated the Concerto for Group and Orchestra; the original score having been lost. It was once again performed at the Royal Albert Hall in September 1999, this time with the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Paul Mann. The concert also featured songs from each member’s solo careers, as well as a short Deep Purple set, and the occasion was commemorated on the 2000 album In Concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. In early 2001 two similar concerts were performed in Tokyo and released as part of the box set The Soundboard Series.

Much of the next few years was spent on the road touring. The group continued forward until 2002, when founding member Jon Lord (who, along with Ian Paice, was the only member to be in all incarnations of the band) announced his amicable retirement from the band to pursue personal projects (especially orchestral work). Rock keyboard veteran Don Airey (Rainbow/Ozzy Osbourne), who had helped Deep Purple out when Lord was injured in 2001, joined the band. In 2002, Deep Purple released their first studio album in five years, the highly praised (but controversially titled) Bananas, and began touring in support of the album immediately. In July 2005 the band played at the Live 8 concert in Park Place (Ontario) and, in October of the same year, released their next album Rapture of the Deep. It was followed by the Rapture of the Deep tour.

These guys burned down the house in more ways than one. They were and still are legendary. This is why they appear in this forum. They achieved something many could not. Notoriety on an infinite level. Keep on space Truckin'!
"Master of images-Songs cast a light on you"
N2yes

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Re: Deep Purple

Postby happytheman » Wed Aug 29, 2007 12:20 am

N2yes wrote:Deep Purple were an English hard rock band formed in Hertfordshire in 1968.[4] Along with Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, they are considered one of the pioneers of heavy metal and hard rock,[5] although the members of the band have always refused to label themselves as the former. They are claimed to have sold over 100 million albums worldwide.[6]

The band has gone through many line-up changes, as well as an eight-year hiatus and two reunions. Their second and most commercially successful line-up featured: Ian Gillan (singer), Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Jon Lord (keyboard), Roger Glover (bass guitar) and Ian Paice (drums). Paice is the only original member still with the band.
(1964–1968) Pre-Deep Purple years

In 1967, former Searchers drummer Chris Curtis contacted London businessman Tony Edwards in the hope that he would manage a new group he was putting together, to be called Roundabout; so called because the members would get on and off like a musical roundabout. Suitably impressed, Edwards agreed to finance the venture with two business partners: John Coletta and Ron Hire (Hire-Edwards-Coletta – HEC Enterprises).hi

The first recruit was classically trained Hammond organ player Jon Lord, who had most notably played with The Artwoods (led by Art Wood, brother of future Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie, and featuring Keef Hartley). He was followed by session guitarist Ritchie Blackmore who was persuaded to return from Hamburg to audition for the new group. Curtis soon dropped out, but HEC Enterprises, as well as Lord and Blackmore, were keen to carry on.

For the bass guitar, Lord suggested his old friend Nick Simper, with whom he had played in a band called The Flower Pot Men and their Garden (formerly known as The Ivy League) back in 1967. Simper's claims to fame (apart from Purple) were that he had been in Johnny Kidd & The Pirates and had been in the car crash that killed Kidd. He was also in Screaming Lord Sutch's The Savages, where he played with Blackmore.

The line-up was completed by singer Rod Evans and drummer Ian Paice from The Maze. After a brief tour of Denmark in the spring of 1968, Blackmore suggested a new name: Deep Purple, which was his grandmother's favourite song.

1968–1970) Breakthrough

In October 1968, the group had tremendous success in the US (but not the UK) with a cover of Joe South's "Hush", which reached #4. The song was taken from their debut album Shades of Deep Purple, and they were booked to support Cream on their Goodbye tour.

The band's second album, The Book of Taliesyn, was released in the United States to coincide with this tour, although it would not be released in their home country until the following year. 1969 saw the release of their third album, Deep Purple, which contained strings and woodwind on one track (April). Several influences were in evidence, notably Vanilla Fudge and Lord's classical antecedants such as Bach and Rimskiy Korsakov.

After these three albums and extensive touring in the States, their American record company, Tetragrammaton, went out of business, leaving the band with no money and an uncertain future. (Tetragrammaton's assets were assumed by Warner Bros. Records, who would release Deep Purple's records in the U.S. throughout the 1970's.) Returning to England in early 1969, they recorded a single called "Emmaretta", named for a cast member of the musical Hair whom Rod Evans was trying to seduce, before Evans and Simper were fired.

The band hunted down singer Ian Gillan from Episode Six, a band that had released several singles in the UK without achieving their big break. Six's drummer Mick Underwood - an old comrade of Blackmore's from his Savages days - made the introductions, and bassist Roger Glover tagged along for the initial sessions. Purple persuaded Glover to join full-time; an act that effectively killed Episode Six and gave Underwood a guilt complex that lasted nearly a decade - until Gillan recruited him for his new post-Purple band in the late 1970s.

This created the quintessential Deep Purple "Mark 2" lineup, whose first, inauspicious release was a Greenaway-Cook tune titled "Hallelujah", which flopped.

The band gained some much-needed publicity with the Concerto for Group and Orchestra, a three-movement epic composed by Lord as a solo project and performed by the band at the Royal Albert Hall with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Malcolm Arnold. Together with Five Bridges by The Nice, it was one of the first collaborations between a rock band and an orchestra, although at the time, certain members of Purple (Blackmore and Gillan especially) were less than happy at the group being tagged as "a group who played with orchestras" when actually what they had in mind was to develop the band into a much tighter, hard-rocking style.

(1970–1976) On top of the world and breakup

Shortly after the orchestral release, the band began a hectic touring and recording schedule that was to see little respite for the next three years. Their first studio album of this period, released in mid-1970, was Deep Purple in Rock (a name deliberately chosen to distance the rock album from the concerto) and contained the then concert staples "Speed King", "Into The Fire", and "Child in Time". The band also issued the UK Top Ten single "Black Night". Blackmore's and Lord's guitar-keyboard interplay coupled with Ian Gillan's howling vocals and the rhythm section of Glover and Paice, now started to take on a unique identity and become instantly recognisable to rock fans throughout Europe.

A second album, the more mellow and creatively progressive Fireball (a favourite of Gillan but not of the rest of the band ), was issued in the summer of 1971. The title track "Fireball" was released as a single, as was "Strange Kind of Woman" - not from the album but recorded during the same sessions.

Within weeks of Fireball's release, the band was already performing songs planned for the next album. One song (which later became "Highway Star") was performed at the first gig of the Fireball tour, having been written on the bus to a show in Portsmouth, in answer to a journalist's question: "How do you go about writing songs?" Three months later, in December 1971, the band found itself in Switzerland to record Machine Head. The album was due to be recorded at a casino in Montreux, using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio, but a fire during a Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention gig burned down the casino. The album was actually recorded at the nearby empty Grand Hotel. This incident famously inspired the song "Smoke on the Water". Gillan believes that he witnessed a man fire a flare gun into the ceiling during the concert, prompting Zappa to comment: "Arthur Brown in person!"

Continuing from where both previous albums left off, Machine Head has since become one of the band's most famous albums, including tracks that became live classics such as "Highway Star", "Space Truckin' ", "Lazy", and "Smoke on the Water", all of which were performed in their live album Made in Japan. Deep Purple continued to tour and record at a rate that would be rare thirty years on: when Machine Head was recorded, the group had only been together three and a half years, yet it was their seventh LP. Meanwhile the band undertook four US tours in 1972 and the August tour of Japan that led to a double-vinyl live release, Made in Japan. Originally intended as a Japan-only record, its world-wide release saw the double become an instant hit. It remains one of rock music's most popular and highest selling live concert recordings (although at the time it was perhaps seen as less important, as only Glover and Paice turned up to mix it).

The classic Purple Mk 2 line-up continued to work and released the album Who Do We Think We Are (1973), featuring the hit single "Woman from Tokyo", but internal tensions and exhaustion were more noticeable than ever. The bad feelings culminated in Ian Gillan quitting the band after their second tour of Japan in the summer of 1973, and Roger Glover being pushed out with him. Their replacements were an unknown singer from Saltburn in North East England, David Coverdale, and Midlands bassist/vocalist Glenn Hughes, formerly of Trapeze. This new line-up continued into 1974 with the heavier blues-rock album Burn, another highly successful release and world tour. Hughes and Coverdale added both vocal harmonies and a more funky element to the band's music, a sound that was even more apparent on the late 1974 release Stormbringer. Besides the title track, the album had a number of songs that received much radio play, such as "Lady Double Dealer", "The Gypsy", and "Soldier Of Fortune". Yet Blackmore voiced unhappiness with the album, and as a result left the band in the spring of 1975 to form his own band with Ronnie James Dio and Elf, called Rainbow.

With Blackmore's departure, Deep Purple was left to fill one of the biggest vacancies in rock music. In spite of this, the rest of the band refused to go down without a fight, and to the surprise of many long-time fans actually announced a replacement for the "irreplaceable" Man in Black; American Tommy Bolin.

It was Coverdale who had suggested auditioning Bolin. "He walked in, thin as a rake, his hair coloured green, yellow, and blue with feathers in it. Slinking along beside him was this stunning Hawaiian girl in a crochet dress with nothing on underneath. He plugged into four Marshall 100-watt stacks and . . ."[citation needed] The job was his. Bolin had been a member of many now-forgotten mid-60s bands - Denny & The Triumphs, American Standard, and Zephyr, which released three albums from '69-72. Before Purple, Bolin's best-known recordings were made as a session musician on Billy Cobham's 1973 jazz fusion album, Spectrum, and on The James Gang's "Bang" (1973) and "Miami" (1974). He had also jammed with such luminaries as Dr. John, Albert King, and Alphonse Mouzon and was busy working on his first solo album, Teaser, when he accepted the invitation to join Deep Purple.

The resulting album, Come Taste the Band, was released in the US in October 1975. Despite mixed reviews, the collection revitalised the band once again, bringing a new, extreme funk edge to their hard rock sound. Bolin's influence was crucial, and with encouragement from Glenn Hughes and David Coverdale, the guitarist came up with much of the material. Later, Bolin's personal problems with drugs began to manifest themselves, and after cancelled shows and below-par concert performances, the writing was on the wall for the band.

(1976–1984) Band split, side projects

The end came on tour in Britain in March 1976 at the Liverpool Empire Theatre. David Coverdale reportedly walked off in tears and handed in his resignation, to which he was allegedly told there was no band left to quit. The decision to pull the plug on Purple had been made some time before the last show by Lord and Paice (the last remaining original members), who hadn't told anyone else. The break-up was finally made public in July 1976.

Later, Bolin had just finished recording his second solo album, Private Eyes, when, on December 4, 1976, tragedy struck. In Miami, during a tour supporting Jeff Beck, Bolin was found unconscious by his girlfriend. Unable to wake him, she hurriedly called paramedics, but it was too late. The official cause of death: multiple-drug intoxication. He was 25 years old.

After the break-up most of the past and present members of Deep Purple went on to have considerable success in a number of other bands, including Rainbow, Whitesnake, Black Sabbath and Gillan. There were, however, a number of promoter-led attempts to get the band to reform, especially with the revival of the hard rock market in the late 70s/early 80s. By 1980, a new version of the band surfaced.

(1984–1994) Reunions and breakups

In 1980, Rod Evans, along with a group of unknown musicians, toured under the banner of Deep Purple. As he was the only original member, and one little known to most fans, this band was instantly derided by press and fans alike as a fraud. The lineup performed concerts in Mexico and the USA before legal action was taken to deny them the use of the name. More information on this "fake" Deep Purple is available here and here.

However, in April 1984, eight years after the demise of Deep Purple, a full-scale (and legal) reunion took place. It was announced on BBC radio's The Friday Rock Show that the "classic" early 70s line-up of Blackmore, Gillan, Glover, Lord, and Paice was reforming and recording new material. The band signed deals with Rainbow's labels, Polydor Records in Europe and Mercury in North America (both labels were at the time owned by PolyGram, and are now part of the Universal Music Group). The album Perfect Strangers was released in October 1984. A solid release, it sold extremely well, and included the singles and concert staples "Knockin' At Your Back Door" and "Perfect Strangers". The reunion tour followed, starting in Australia and wending its way across the world to the USA, then into Europe by the following summer. Financially, the tour was also a tremendous success. The UK homecoming proved limited, as they elected to play just a single festival show at Knebworth (with main support from the Scorpions). The weather was famously bad but 80,000 turned up anyway.

The line-up then recorded The House of Blue Light in 1986, which was followed by a world tour in 1987. This was followed by another live album Nobody's Perfect (1988) which was culled from several shows on this tour, but still largely based around the by-now familiar "Made in Japan" set-list. In the UK a new version of "Hush" was released to mark 20 years of the band. In 1989, Ian Gillan was fired from the band, as his relations with Blackmore had again soured, and their musical differences had widened too far. Gillan's replacement was former Rainbow vocalist Joe Lynn Turner. This line up recorded just one album, Slaves & Masters (1990) and toured in support. It is one of Blackmore's favourite Purple albums, though some fans regard it as little more than a Rainbow album. In fact, caustic critics dubbed the album "Deep Rainbow." Despite the renewed excellence of the band during this period, many hard-core fans were unhappy with Turner, preferring Gillan.

With the tour done, Turner was forced out, as Lord, Paice and Glover wanted Gillan back in the fold. Blackmore relented and the classic line-up recorded The Battle Rages On in 1993. During the European tour during the fall of 1993, tensions between Gillan and Blackmore came to a head yet again. Blackmore walked out in November 1993, never to return. Joe Satriani was drafted in, so the live dates (in Japan) in December could be completed. Satriani stayed on for a European Summer tour in 1994, and he was asked to stay permanently, but his record contract commitments prevented this. The band unanimously chose Dixie Dregs/Kansas guitarist Steve Morse to become Blackmore's permanent successor.

(1994–present) Revival with Steve Morse
Roger Glover and Steve Morse jamming during the intro to Highway Star

Steve Morse’s arrival revitalised the band creatively, and in 1996 a new album titled Purpendicular was released, showing a wide variety of musical styles. With a revamped set list to tour, Deep Purple enjoyed success throughout the rest of the 1990s, releasing the harder-sounding Abandon in 1998, and touring with renewed enthusiasm. In 1999, Jon Lord, with the help of a fan who was also a musicologist and composer, painstakingly recreated the Concerto for Group and Orchestra; the original score having been lost. It was once again performed at the Royal Albert Hall in September 1999, this time with the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Paul Mann. The concert also featured songs from each member’s solo careers, as well as a short Deep Purple set, and the occasion was commemorated on the 2000 album In Concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. In early 2001 two similar concerts were performed in Tokyo and released as part of the box set The Soundboard Series.

Much of the next few years was spent on the road touring. The group continued forward until 2002, when founding member Jon Lord (who, along with Ian Paice, was the only member to be in all incarnations of the band) announced his amicable retirement from the band to pursue personal projects (especially orchestral work). Rock keyboard veteran Don Airey (Rainbow/Ozzy Osbourne), who had helped Deep Purple out when Lord was injured in 2001, joined the band. In 2002, Deep Purple released their first studio album in five years, the highly praised (but controversially titled) Bananas, and began touring in support of the album immediately. In July 2005 the band played at the Live 8 concert in Park Place (Ontario) and, in October of the same year, released their next album Rapture of the Deep. It was followed by the Rapture of the Deep tour.

These guys burned down the house in more ways than one. They were and still are legendary. This is why they appear in this forum. They achieved something many could not. Notoriety on an infinite level. Keep on space Truckin'!

Once again N2 you have out done yourself!! You sure you didn't miss your calling as a writer for some "big" rock magazine? I guess I'm good at "talking" but to type the amount you write, would leave my fingers exhausted.
Anyway on to the post. Deep Purple certainly gets high marks for never giving up, particularly in the early years when it had to have been tough "carving" out a niche with the fans that had several "other" bands that fit in the same "genre". I loved the early stuff. In fact I recently bough a DVD of the 72, 73 tour. Some of it is Black and White while the rest is color. Watching the shots of the fans is great, in some places you would think there were 10 and 11 year olds hanging down by the stage. Lord spent more than a few minutes watching Keith Emerson to say the least. But he could make his keyboard wail. And while I never had the chance to see them play live I must say that Paice held his own with any of the drummers of that time period. He simply does not quit through the whole concert. Another great CD I have of theirs (from the same time period) which has a booklet that could give your review of the band a run for it's money is called Deep Purple in Concert. First CD covers the 1970 tour and the second covers the 1972 tour.
The bit about Tommy Bolin always hit's me. He was such an incredible guitar player. If you haven't heard the one N2 mentioned (Billy Cobham) you need to. And both of his solo releases were great. Such a shame that such talent was layed to waste by "self indulgence"
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby sound_chaser » Sat Oct 04, 2008 7:53 am

So, what's the best Deep Purple album? Gotta be either In Rock, or Machine Head, don't you think? How about songs: which one rocks out the best? Highway Star, probably, but Speed King still gets me going today.
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby tardistraveler » Mon Oct 06, 2008 7:39 pm

I've always been partial to LIVE albums, and love "Made in Japan" back in the day . . . ;)
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby N2yes » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:48 am

And to think, Mr. Medvedev finds Deep Purple to be his favorite as well. He can't be all bad.
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby sound_chaser » Wed Nov 12, 2008 8:21 am

N2yes wrote:And to think, Mr. Medvedev finds Deep Purple to be his favorite as well. He can't be all bad.


Does he? I didn't know that. Mind you, they do like their hard rock on that side of the world. What's his favourite album :D eep Purple In Rockski?
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby Greenglade's Frog » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:33 pm

Smoke in the Water was sooooo seminal(what does that mean?) back when I first heard it on AM radio back in like 74. It was really heavy older brother collection type mysterious man
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby Chris2210 » Thu Nov 13, 2008 10:08 am

There isn't much in the way of qualitive assessment in that Wiki article, is there? I suppose that's fair enough.

I actually bought their last album on the strength of the title track, which in hindsight was a bit of a mistake. (There's nothing else in quite the same league as Rapture of the Deep).

My attitude to the band is that whilst i enjoy some of their material (there are occasional gems such as Child in Time), they were always the most commercial of the big rock bands of their era and as such a blueprint for many of the mainstream 80s and later MOR rock acts of the Bon Jovi ilk.

This is not a good thing.

More than a cursory glance at the 'seminal' Smoke on the Water, beyond its iconic riffage shows it to be a fairly straightforward pop song with some woefully embarrassing lyrics - belying the pomp and drama of its portentous tone. If that sounds too dismissive, it's because they're often mentioned in the same breath as the likes of Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath and to paraphrase Mike Myers, "They're not worthy".
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby 2Lizard4 » Fri Nov 14, 2008 5:00 am

When I was young, I could chew glass, swallow nails, stay awake all night, and live off a cup of water. Now I cant make it 5 feet without a cup of coffee
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby sound_chaser » Fri Nov 14, 2008 8:04 am

tardistraveler wrote:I've always been partial to LIVE albums, and love "Made in Japan" back in the day . . . ;)


Made In Japan, is, of course, one of the seminal live albums and yet it contains one of the most glorious cock-up’s ever committed to vinyl. When beginning the mighty riff to Smoke On the Water, Blackmore falls right off and has to circle around to pick it up: it cracks me up every time.
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby N2yes » Sat Nov 15, 2008 1:11 am

Happytheman, though I never acknowledged it, Chris' post reminded me of something I thought I had done in another thread but may not have. Most of those words telling the history of a lot of these bands were taken directly from Wikipedia's cyber pages. Perhaps a third of these intro-primers regarding the bands were written by me. The rest, such as this one, only have a paragraph or two in them that I added merely to augment my belief that said band belonged in this forum. For not having acknowledged that earlier, I do offer my deepest apologies. Though I have in no way been accused of anything, I felt very poorly after noticing an absence of citing my source. Trust me, I simply overlooked it as I was actually just trying to expedite getting this forum up and running. Still, I had to get this off my chest. Actually, there are many on this board, including myself, that could have written a better article given the chance. I had the chance, just didn't have the time.
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby virginiaprograsser » Sun Apr 12, 2009 10:16 pm

I really enjoyed Deep Purple back in the day, especially Machine Head, Live In Japan, and Stormbringer. I also still enjoy their earliest releases on Tetragrammaton - Deep Purple, Shades of Deep Purple, and The Book of Taliesyn (maybe because it has the syllable 'syn' in it... :) . Anyway, I have not gotten any of these albums on cd or as downloads and even though I still love my vinyl I don't pull it out much any more - too lazy. This thread has got me thinking about it, however. Thanks.

:) Steve S-N
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby the greenman » Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:44 pm

N2yes wrote:Happytheman, though I never acknowledged it, Chris' post reminded me of something I thought I had done in another thread but may not have. Most of those words telling the history of a lot of these bands were taken directly from Wikipedia's cyber pages. Perhaps a third of these intro-primers regarding the bands were written by me. The rest, such as this one, only have a paragraph or two in them that I added merely to augment my belief that said band belonged in this forum. For not having acknowledged that earlier, I do offer my deepest apologies. Though I have in no way been accused of anything, I felt very poorly after noticing an absence of citing my source. Trust me, I simply overlooked it as I was actually just trying to expedite getting this forum up and running. Still, I had to get this off my chest. Actually, there are many on this board, including myself, that could have written a better article given the chance. I had the chance, just didn't have the time.


I dont think there's any need to apologise, I think its been a blast, to think again about these great bands. I think Purple are pretty good - 'Burn' was one of the first albums I bought. & I quite like 'Smoke on the Water' - tells it like it happend - went down to montreaux to make records on the Rolling Stone's mobile & the darn place burns down!

But we're missing Ritchie arent we? While he's off on his minstrel in the gallery bit.. Who can blame him, he's probably done more struttin' than most!

I saw a recent live concert some time back on satellite & was impressed with how these guys still RRRaaackk! Great 'heavy blues' sound. Man, I wish I could play like that when I want to play like that!
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby tardistraveler » Tue Jun 09, 2009 4:46 pm

I saw Deep Purple back in '73 - a teriffic show!

Actually I traveled to Atlanta to see them twice - upon arriving the first time, we heard on the radio that the show had been postponed, so we returned a few days later for the show. The folks that were originally going to go with us couldn't come back for the rescheduled concert, so they gave their tix to a guy named Eric, and his buddy who I don't remember his name.

So, we showed up at the concert, wondering why Eric and friend weren't there yet. Then the concert was late starting - someone finally came on stage to announce that all the equipment was held up on the interstate due to traffic heading to Atlanta Stadium for the Billy Graham Crusade, of all things. Finally, roadies started setting up the equipment - no Eric.

ZZTop was the opening act, and we thoroughly enjoyed them, although Eric didn't make it in time. As Deep Purple took the stage, Eric and friend finally showed. Quizzing them after the show - we got this weird story as to why they were late . . .

"Man, we picked up this hitchhiker when we were leaving Nashville, and he MADE us take him to Birmingham!"

"OMG - did he have a gun?"

"No, man, he just MADE us take him!"

"If he didn't have a gun, then how did he MAKE you take him?"

"Man, he just MADE us take him . . . "

Eric and friend were obviously under the influence of some pretty strong stuff . . . :rolleyes:


I also have some very bad pics of this show, taken with an old-style 126 Instamatic - lol - the view of the back of the guy's head in front of us came out great! :D
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Re: Deep Purple

Postby Freeyyaa » Fri Oct 28, 2016 12:49 am

What a good thread! I thought, that Yes-fiends have forgotten about Deep Purple as they do not play pure prog-rock.
Now the turned to soft-rock with an admixture of prog.
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