pick it up

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poodeeo
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pick it up

Post: # 523Post poodeeo
Fri Mar 29, 2002 3:37 am

Just a fun question and a way to share & learn. What's your favorite pick(s)? Sure, different picks for different styles & guitars, but lately I've been really digg'n Dunlop Jazz II & III's. these are quite firm, red little picks. One is more rounded, the other more pointed. For me, they're easy to hold and I love the feel. I used to use the thinner, full size dunlops, like .6-.8, but I've come to appreciate using a firmer pick, with less hand/finger tension when I want to strum.


How's about you?

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Ed Schaum
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Post: # 15150Post Ed Schaum
Fri Mar 29, 2002 3:55 am

Grrrr, bad topic. I've been unhappy for years.


Somewhere around '72, I found some really excellent picks. White celluloid, very thick, and easily shaved to a sharp point, yet they'd last for an entire week playing the acoustic. I bought several gross, and they lasted about 25 years.

I was starting to run low on them a few years ago, but something worse happened - they dried out and started sound scratchy on the strings. I couldn't find picks like these anywhere, so I had to find something else.

I searched for a long time and never found anything equivalent. I settled for something else and am now pretty happy with them.

Dunlop Tortex Sharp 1.0mm (blue). They're not sharp enough out of the bag, so I still shave them to a deadly point. These last a very long time, at least a month, but they don't have that hard hard feel that the celluloid picks had.

If the celluloids were a 10 for me, these are a 9 - excellent, they do the job, but they're still sort of missing something. The super hard pick combined with the sharp point gives excellent control at any volume.

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khalpin
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Post: # 15167Post khalpin
Fri Mar 29, 2002 6:32 am

Fender Mediums, the classic brown swirly looking ones. I've been using nothing but them for over 20 years. Everything else is very uncomfortable for me.

guilddigger
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Post: # 15178Post guilddigger
Fri Mar 29, 2002 8:44 am

<font face='Comic Sans MS'>on solo gigs i pick with my nails armored with fibreglass and nail glue. when i play with the band, i´m more rythm oriented, so i use the grey jim dunlop .73 pick. on electric a little heavier. i like the jim dunlop picks because they don´t slip.

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<hr>stay awaken

fragilesi
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Post: # 15180Post fragilesi
Fri Mar 29, 2002 9:02 am

I'm sorry guys, I think that you over-estimate the importance of the style, make or type of picks. I've tried all shapes, sizes and brands and can say with complete authority that it makes no difference whatsoever, zippo, none, nowt, nothing.

I sound just as awful and out of time with all of them!

Simon.

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psychopomp95
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Post: # 15325Post psychopomp95
Sat Mar 30, 2002 3:52 pm

A few months ago I probably would've responded like you just did Simon! <img src=pix/icon_smile_tongue.gif border=0 align=middle>
However, I HAVE always liked heavier picks (lead playing is easier and faster with them, and you can dig into the strings more; plus I keep rhythm better with them), and it seems like lately I notice some picks I have slip really easily! So I like ones that don't fly out of my hands or slip off my fingers! <img src=pix/icon_smile_wink.gif border=0 align=middle> As for thumbpicks, I don't use them too much, but if I do then they should be fairly small... I don't like them sticking out too much because my thumb will catch otherwise!

poodeeo
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Post: # 15361Post poodeeo
Sun Mar 31, 2002 2:36 am

<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>
<b>guilddigger wrote:</b>
<font face='Comic Sans MS'>on solo gigs i pick with my nails armored with fibreglass and nail glue. when i play with the band, i´m more rythm oriented, so i use the grey jim dunlop .73 pick. on electric a little heavier. i like the jim dunlop picks because they don´t slip.

</font id='Comic Sans MS'>

<hr>stay awaken
<hr height=1 noshade id=quote></font id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote>

Hey, I got a question for you digger, do you use a specific type of nail kit? I ask because I have a thumb that really curves upward at the last joint, and for classical, in order to keep the thumb relaxed, I have to grow that particular nail very long, and it's a hassle. i've never tried any nail kits, but maybe it's time. Are they easy to use or messy and time consuming?

guilddigger
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Post: # 15646Post guilddigger
Tue Apr 02, 2002 2:14 am

<font face='Comic Sans MS'>hi poodeeo,
here´s what i do. i put on a disguise and go to a beauty parlor to buy this stuff.
it´s a nailshaped stick-on fabric that you cut to fit, put on your nails and then apply a few layers of fake-nail glue. i use the glue that comes with a brush in the cap, that´s not so messy. it takes a little while to do this, i pick with four fingers, but if you only need it for your thumb it should take no time.
i´ve tried an acrylic laquer that turn your nails into lethal weapons. it lasts longer but is more expensive. i also found the nails had become more fragile when the acrylic came off. if you ask a manicurist they´ll tell you what you need. good luck buddy!

</font id='Comic Sans MS'>

<hr>stay awaken

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Ed Schaum
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Post: # 15650Post Ed Schaum
Tue Apr 02, 2002 2:48 am

I used to do the same thing with the silk, the acrylic, the powder, and the crazy glue.

I gave up on that for several reasons though -

Your nails start to get really thick and unnatural loooking.

They get brittle. Very strong, but if you hit them the wrong way, you get a giant crack, which sometimes cracks the actual nail too.

I've now come up with a solution that works very well.

I use Jonel Vitamin E & Kevlar Nail Strengthener on the 4 playing fingers of my left hand (right hand for most of you).

You can help your nails get stronger too. First, file your nails down more than necessary. You won't be able to use them, but you need to make them stronger. Start using the kevlar, and EVERY DAY, file your nails down just a little just to keep the edges smooth. For a while, this will keep them too short to be useful, but will help make them strong. Slowly let them get a little longer, and be sure to let the sides grow too, if the middle sticks out too far, they break much easier. Once you get the sides to grow as long as the middle, you'll be in good shape.

I almost never break a nail anymore. It's a good idea to shape and smooth the edges every day, this way you don't develop a nick that could turn into a break.

Jeez, this is turning into a nail salon.

poodeeo
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Post: # 15656Post poodeeo
Tue Apr 02, 2002 4:02 am

Thanks. But Ed, like I said, because of the curve of my thumb, I have to grow the nail really long. Strength isn't the issue. And because I do surgery, a long thumb nail tends to puncture gloves-not good. i guess i could always fracture the thumb and re-set it pointing down a bit. Don't think so. Maybe I'll forget the nail and put some artificial callous on the part that strikes the string. Hey, I could get rich on that!

Thanks guys

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Ed Schaum
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Post: # 15659Post Ed Schaum
Tue Apr 02, 2002 4:12 am

<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>
<b>poodeeo wrote:</b>
Thanks. But Ed, like I said, because of the curve of my thumb, I have to grow the nail really long. Strength isn't the issue. And because I do surgery, a long thumb nail tends to puncture gloves-not good. i guess i could always fracture the thumb and re-set it pointing down a bit. Don't think so. Maybe I'll forget the nail and put some artificial callous on the part that strikes the string. Hey, I could get rich on that!

Thanks guys
<hr height=1 noshade id=quote></font id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote>



Well, Andres Segovia had a solution for unexpected nail breakage at gigs, maybe you can adapt it somehow.

He always carried a ping pong ball with him (well, later in his career, anyway). They are easily cut into nail shaped crescents, and if you place a crescent UNDER a broken or problem nail, then crazy glue it in place, it makes a pretty good substitute. Maybe you could adapt that technique to work for you, especially with the built in curve on the ball surface.

poodeeo
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Post: # 15662Post poodeeo
Tue Apr 02, 2002 4:52 am

Yeah, my guitar instructor told me about the ping pong ball trick a few years ago for a brken nail. I forgot about it. I guess that makes it a thumb ball.

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